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Recipes that include tomato

Santorini Lobster – Attempt 1

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Our first year anniversary is coming up (June 1st!), so perhaps that is conjuring themes of romance and memories of our honeymoon.

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One of the best moments of our honeymoon had to be sitting at Sunset Taverna, dining by the bay (three feet from it) in Santorini, Greece, and enjoying the best lobster pasta dish either of us ever had.

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Braised Lamb Shanks with Chickpeas and Dried Fruit

Thursday, January 8, 2009

This dish is inspired by Moroccan flavors, which I love. The use of fruit brightens up the rich and heavy flavors of lamb. Although this dish does require some work, with so many ingredients, it is all very simple considering the restaurant quality meal you’ll be able to present.

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Slow Roasted Tomatoes

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Now that tomato season is over, you won’t be able to get those wonderful farmer’s market tomatoes. You’ll need this recipe to deal with the supermarket quality ones, or more like non-quality ones. I make this in large batches because it’s work intensive but stores well. I wish I made 4 times this amount.

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Hummus, Quinoa Tabbouleh, and Eggplant Caperberry Salad

Monday, September 1, 2008

As I mentioned in my previous post, I served Moroccan Spiced Chops with Pluot Sauce to Angie and Scott. You don’t think that’s all I served, do you? Of course not! Meals at our place are always feasts! With that we had Tzatziki (I’ve posted this recipe before), Hummus, Quinoa Tabbouleh, Eggplant Caperberry Salad, and fresh Pita. Here are the recipes to make your feast!

I can’t believe I’ve never posted a hummus recipe. If you have a food processor, it is so easy to make, you’ll never pay for store bought versions again. Take this recipe as a guideline, adjusting to your taste. My tahini (which we brought home from Greece) is super dark so here I use 1 tablespoon but you might need more. Keep in mind that the quality of your ingredients will make a big difference here, especially what olive oil you use.

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Inside the Despana Basket: Pimientos in Olive Oil and Quick Chicken Chorizo Rice

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

I didn’t realize until I opened this jar of Pimientos, from our Despana Basket, that it was packed in olive oil. I normally buy the ones jarred with brine. The olive oil does add a bit of flavor and the fat coats your tongue nicely if eaten alone. I’m not sure it makes a big difference when cooked in a rice dish. It certainly doesn’t hurt though.

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I wanted to make a quick one-pot meal tonight, having stood all day, and just not in the mood for experimenting. Lon just came in from the pouring rain, completely soaked, and I wanted something comforting, guaranteed to warm him up. Well, this dish worked, a cheaper and easier version of Paella, because these are the ingredients I had. We finished the whole thing, which was really meant to be dinner and his lunch for tomorrow.

Quick Chicken Chorizo Rice
~3 servings

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 11 ounces boneless chicken thigh, diced
  • 3.5 ounces chorizo, cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 cup rice
  • 1/4 cup chopped pimientos in olive oil
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • scant 1/2 cup frozen peas
  • 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
  • salt and pepper to taste

1. Heat oil in a 11″ skillet (2 1/2″ deep) over medium high heat. Add onions & cook until starting to soften, about 2 minutes.
2. Add chicken. Season with salt and pepper and stir until the outsides of the chicken pieces are cooked, about 2min.
3. Add chorizo and stir for another 2minutes.
4. Add pimientos and rice, stirring until rice is coated with oil and pan juices.
5. Stir in two cups of chicken broth and bring to boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook covered until liquid is absorbed, about 12 minutes.
6. Stir in frozen peas, which will cook in less than a minute.
7. Remove the rice dish to a serving platter and toss tomatoes on top.

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Pasta Tasting – Course 1: Wilted Spinach and Tomato Orzo Salad

Saturday, May 3, 2008

Tomorrow, I’m riding in the NYC Bike Tour with a group of friends. So tonight, I had them over for a preparatory pasta dinner. The idea is to have pasta so I decided on a three course pasta tasting. The first course would be a salad, yet still a pasta, but proportionately heavier on the vegetables because two more pasta courses would follow.

Wilted Spinach and Tomato Orzo Salad

  • 4 oz dry Whole Wheat Orzo
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 10 ounce package of pre-washed spinach
  • 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 generous pinches of salt
  • 6 Campari Tomatoes, cut into 6-8 wedges each
  • 2 teaspoon good Olive Oil
  • 1 tablespoons Aged Cherry Flavored Balsamic (from O & Co.)
  • 3 tablespoons garlic cream (from the potato post)
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

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Goan Chilly Fries

Saturday, March 8, 2008


I love French fries and our friend at Finely Chopped, was kind enough to write me a recipe for Goan Chilly Fries. He gave me some choices so here’s exactly how I made it.

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Paella

Saturday, March 17, 2007

In Chinatown on Wednesday, Jessica and I picked up a huge pile of mussels and mahogany clams, we’re talking about four pounds here– they were just so cheap, $6 total. Jess had just under a pound for dinner that night, while I went to Devi.

So Thursday night we made paella! While there are many wonderful, foreign dishes that can be found in Manhattan, paella is really not one of them. In my experience, most paella in NYC is terrible, and trust me, I’ve searched. If I do discover any decent, digestible dishes, I’ll let you know.

In the meantime, I suggest you do as I do, and make your own paella. It’s substantially cheaper than can be bought, although it’s still quite an expensive dinner. I’ve made it at least half a dozen times, and am quite good at it by now. It’s delicious to practice! I’ve included my recipe and below that some notes on ensuring success.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large spanish onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 4 ounces chorizo sausage, diced
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken thighs – cut into small chunks/strips
  • 12oz uncooked short grain, white rice
  • 5 cups chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup white wine (red is acceptable to)
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 pinch saffron
  • salt to taste & ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 squid, cleaned and cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 2 tomatoes, seeded and chopped
  • 1/2 cup frozen green peas
  • 12 large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 pound mussels, cleaned and debearded
  • 1 pound clams, cleaned
  • 1/4 cup chopped Italian flat leaf parsley
  • lemon, for garnish
  • Spanish paprika, for garnish

Directions

  1. Heat olive oil in a paella pan over medium heat. Add in onion, garlic and pepper; cook and stir for a few minutes. Add chorizo sausage, chicken, and rice; cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in 3 1/2 cups stock, wine & vinegar, thyme leaves, and saffron. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, and simmer for 15 minutes; stir occasionally.
  2. Taste the rice, and check to see if it is cooked. If the rice is uncooked (it likely will be), stir in 1/2 cup more stock. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally. Stir in additional stock if necessary, up to 2 cups additional stock, 5 cups total. Cook until rice is done.
  3. Stir in tomatoes and peas, arrange clams on top. Cook covered for 5 minutes. Stir in squid and arrange remaining seafood on top. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Uncover and scatter parsley over the food. Serve with lemon garnish (perhaps covered in cheesecloth, stretch wraps), dust with paprika.

Tips for Success

  • Paella should have a complex flavor, developed from the smokiness of chorizo and dusting of paprika constrasted with the brightness of saffron, wine, and lemon. Know your flavors and how to develop them.
  • Paella is traditionally made using arborio rice. However, since it is expensive, rarely used, and difficult to work with, I prefer short grain rice (I also have a bucket around). Arborio is starchier, so to get the same texture, just work the short grain rice frequently and use more liquid than you normally would.
  • As you can tell from the directions, paella is cooked in successive layers of flavors. Use these as guides for how frequently to stir. In the beginning you can not over stir and at the end you can not under stir. In other words, stir frequently at the beginning and slow down with each step. By the end, when you’re adding seafood, do not stir AT ALL.
  • Plate with plenty of rice, seafood, lemon and paprika.

Mangia!

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Fresh Ravioli

Saturday, March 10, 2007

For lunch today, I scrounged through the fridge and found three leftovers: the sauce from some spicy dduk bok-kee from Korean Grandma; tomato chutney (sweet & tangy from ginger and vinegar) I made to top some tilapia last Sunday; and plain macaroni I boiled a few days ago for my inside-out meatball experiment (which didn’t go very well). I combined it all and added some garlic and mozzarella. It was a delicious lunch.

However, I broke the cardinal rule and had pasta again for dinner! This time I went all out with home-made ravioli. I picked up some spicy Italian sausage from Garden of Eden along with some washed spinach leaves. I didn’t write down the exact recipe, so here goes my best guess (particularly for the filling). In other words, this is a completely unrefined recipe.

Makes about 32 ravioli (~5 servings)

Ingredients: Pasta

  • 2 cups of A.P. Flour + extra for dusting
  • 3 extra large eggs
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • warm water as needed

Ingredients: Filling

  • 2 links of spicy, Italian sausage (skins removed)
  • 2 cloves of garlic, diced
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 5oz spinach leaves (pre-cooked weight)
  • 1 cup ricotta
  • 2 tbsp. grated parmesan-romano
  • dried basil
  • black pepper

Ingredients: Sauce
This is enough for three portions.

  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium, chicken stock
  • 2 cloves of garlic, diced
  • 1 Roma tomato, diced
  • 1 tbsp. corn starch

Instructions: Pasta

  1. In a broad mixing bowl, pour in 2 cups of flour and create a well, into which crack two eggs.
  2. With a fork, wisk the eggs, slowly widening your mixing bringing in the flour, until the mixture is getting dry (about one minute). Add 1 tbsp. olive oil, and warm water as necessary to just bring dough together.
  3. Continue turning and kneeding dough for three minutes, a little flour may be necessary to keep it from sticking. Over time it will not stick. Once basically smooth, flatten into a round and place on your counter, under the bowl you used to mix the flour and eggs. Leave it for at least 15 minutes– this is the perfect time to make the filling (see below).
  4. Once the dough has rested, cut it in half with a large pastry scraper (Jess likes the OXO pastry scraper), and wrap half in plastic wrap.
  5. Flatten the dough with your hand until it’s less than an inch deep. In most cases you do not need a special machine for this, but rolling ravioli dough by hand is insane. We use a pasta/noodle machine (the common Imperia model). Standard approach here: roll the dough through on the widest setting (#1 on ours); dust the dough with flour and brush (with a pastry brush) the extra off, then fold it over itself in half until, when turned 90 degrees, it will fit back through the machine’s width. Repeat this three times, turning 90 degrees each time. Remember to use a little flour between each fold, but not too much.
  6. Then begin reducing the machine’s settings, one step at a time, passing the dough through each time, until you get to the thinnest setting. By this time the dough is unwieldy! I tend to ribbon fold the dough on itself to help manage it while feeding it. Kind of like an S-shape.
  7. Finally lay out the dough, so that half of the length is flat (I keep the other half folded, but you could cut it off and reserve it). Quadrant off 2″ square sections and put a 1 tsp. dollop of the filling into each square.
  8. Prepare an egg wash (equal parts egg and warm water). Brush (I used the great silicone brush
    /> Carol got us) the edges of each square. Then cover the filling/bottom layer with the other half of the dough that was folded off to the side. Carefully push all the air out and try to seal the dough flat. Cut the ravioli squares with a pizza wheel. Scrape them off the counter with your pastry scraper, and place them on a baking sheet and cover with a towel. If they’re a bit wet, dust with some bench flour. We’ll talk about final cooking below.

Instructions: Filling

  1. In a large skillet, sautee the sausage over medium heat in a tbsp of extra virgin olive oil with the diced garlic. Break up the sausage as it cooks into the smallest pieces possible. When done, reserve in a bowl on the side.
  2. In the same skillet (no need to wash), cook the spinach with the basil and black pepper. No additional oil or water is necessary, just cook over medium heat and cover the pan, cook about four minutes.
  3. Chop the cooked spinach into a dice and put in the bowl with sausage.
  4. Once cooled a bit, add an equal amount of ricotta to the bowl, doubling the volume. Then add the parmesan

Instructions: Sauce & Final Prep

  1. In salted, rapidly boiling water, cook ravioli in portions (about 4-6 at at time), for one minute, then reserve in a colander.
  2. In the same skillet where the filling was prepared, still uncleaned, sautee over medium-high heat, the garlic in the olive oil. Then deglaze with white wine.
  3. Add the tomatoes and chicken stock and bring to heat; then stir in the corn starch as a slurry (add enough cold water to liquify starch). Finally stir in ravioli and bring back to temperature and serve.

Bon Appétit!

Check out Flickr for more pictures of the ravioli.

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