Recipe Index (by Ingredients)

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Recipes that include onion

Parsnip Gnocchi with Braised Oxtail

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

I’m quite fond of fatty meats and root vegetables together. It’s possible that both being winter foods, it becomes a familiar combination. But I’m convinced that it’s more than that. Parsnips, carrots, yams, sweet potato, and more are storage organs for the plant and typically contain more sugars and starches than other vegetables. It just works exceptionally well with fatty meats, standing up to it with more flavor and texture.

I’ve been thinking about parsnips and oxtail for a while, flipping from some kind of ravioli, to a mash, to a terrine, and finally deciding on a Parsnip Gnocchi with a Braised Oxtail Sauce.

Parsnip Gnocchi with Oxtail and flower background

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Make Chicken Soup, Not War

Thursday, January 21, 2010

I’ve been working on this post since the beginning of winter, when I first started thinking about chicken soups. The variety of chicken soups across so many cultures is just so interesting to me. They are all different, yet share that common bond, the ability to comfort anyone, and make each of us think of home.

Chicken Orzo Soup

There isn’t anything scientific in the post. I did not set out to prove or disprove anything, or even test any theories. This is not about one being better than the others. I just wanted to try several different recipes and methods, just to take notice and appreciate what each had to offer, and each one did have something special to offer. I will make all of these again, and I hope this post is useful for you each and every winter.

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Lamb Sauce

Thursday, December 10, 2009

When you’re introduced to new people, do you start chattering immediately, or does it take you time to warm-up and get comfortable? It always surprises me when Lon starts talking to random people outside, a guy waiting on line in front of us, the check-out clerk at Bed Bath & Beyond, or the couple standing in front of the restaurant we just walked out of. Though my friends and family can’t shut me up, I’m cautious around strangers. I just need to melt the ice a little.

Lamb Sauce on Egg Fetuccine 2

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Baby Back Ribs in Vietnamese Caramel Sauce

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Why can’t looking for apartments be as easy as looking for recipes? We’ve been looking for a place to move to, on and off, for two years now, with no end in sight. When I look for recipes, I find what I need most of the time. The two processes are actually quite similar. Step 1: narrow down search by criteria. Step 2: Try it out. This is where they start to diverge and force a completely different step 3, and that’s where apartment hunting becomes my least favorite activity now.

Baby Back Rib in Vietnamese Caramel Sauce 2

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Street Food at Home: Lamb Gyro

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

We’re still touring through California, but for those of you hungry for a recipe, here’s a treat we did just before leaving…

One of my favorite lunch foods (when I’m not strictly following lunch.foodmayhem.com) is street meat.  I’m talking about lamb shawarma from a cart.  One of my favorites in Manhattan is the guy in front of Food Emporium on 14th Street, near Park Ave South.  However, he’s always gone when I get home!  So I had to take matters into my own hands and make my own–a difficult task when you don’t own a spit.

Lamb Gyro in Pita 2

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Liboke ya Mbisi

Wednesday, September 2, 2009

Flounder with tomato and onion

Zoe is that friend that I can live vicariously through. She’s always full of adventurous stories from all the countries she’s been to and all the villages she has lived in. I always look forward to her e-mails about the different lifestyles she witnesses and the people she befriends along the way. Of course, I’m always more interested in the food related parts, so when Zoe got back to the states this time, we got together for some Congolese cooking. Please welcome Zoe:

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Diabetes Cooking For Everyone

Friday, August 28, 2009

When I was asked to review  Diabetes Cooking For Everyone, by Carol Gelles, I couldn’t decide on which recipes to test. So, I left it up to you to vote for 3 out of 9 recipes. Here are the results:

  1. Afghan Lamb with Spinach – 49.1%
  2. Kasha with Walnuts and Mushrooms – 40.4%
  3. Chicken en Brochette with Orange Marmalade and Sherry Marinade – 35.1%

Before I get to reviewing the recipes where I will do my best to be objective, you should know that I cannot be completely objective about Carol. She is my friend and mentor. One day I will write a post all about her when I can gather up all the words I need to express my admiration, gratitude, and love. For this book, all you need to know is that she is an award winning (IACP/Julia Child Cookbook Award and James Beard Award) cookbook author , professionally trained nutritionist, and a type 2 diabetic.

*Recipes are shown here with Carol’s permission.

Afghan Lamb with Spinach 5

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Korean Tacos

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

The LA based Kogi BBQ Truck, serving Korean Tacos, is so famous these days, we hear about it in New York. Sadly, it doesn’t seem like they’re hitting the big apple any time soon. But, I have received a message from a group of guys that are going to be launching their own Korean Taco Truck, The Krave, around Jersey City. More on that soon.

For now, feeling deprived of Korean Tacos, I whipped some up from my imagination. It’s a pretty simplistic take and perfect as an easy party solution.

Korean Beef Taco 3

Korean Tacos
~about 16 (5″) tacos

Red pepper sauce

  • 1/4 cup Korean red pepper paste
  • 1 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil

Beef

  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1/3 cup chopped scallions
  • 1 lb ground beef

Peppers and Onions

  • 2 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups sliced red onion
  • 1/4 cup sliced garlic
  • 1 large bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • kosher salt and white pepper

Assembly

  • 14 to 16 (5″-6″) corn tortillas, warmed
  • sesame seeds for sprinkling

Instructions –

1. Make red pepper sauce by stirring together paste, sugar, and sesame oil. Set aside.

2. Make beef by heating the oil in a medium sized ceramic pot on medium high heat. Stir in scallions and mix for about a minute. Crumble in beef and brown while breaking it up with a wooden spoon. When you don’t see any pink left, mix in 1/4 cup of the red pepper sauce. Stir around for another minute. Remove from heat and set aside.

Korean Beef Taco Filling

3. To make vegetables, heat oil in a wok on high heat. Soften onions and garlic with a few pinches of salt. Add peppers and stir until softened but not mushy. Adjust seasoning.  Set aside.

Peppers and Onions

4. Spread a thin layer of red pepper sauce in the middle of each tortilla (optional). Scoop a generous amount of beef (2 to 3 tablespoons) onto each tortilla and top with peppers and onions. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Korean Beef Taco 8

You can also just set out bowls of each component and allow guests to assemble themselves.

Korean Beef Taco 4

Notes:

You can buy corn tortillas or make them yourself. It’s pretty easy. We just bought instant corn masa flour and followed the directions on the bag.

Maseca

You may have noticed the purple tinge on the peppers. Yup, it’s a purple bell pepper, which looses the darkness of the purple when you cook it but it still looks unique.

You can use any color pepper you want, even a spicy one if you want. They will have different tastes but I can’t imagine any one being bad.

purple pepper, scallon, onion, garlic

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Summer Squash Chili with White Cheddar Cornbread

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Summer Squash Chili with White Cheddar Cornbread 5

My friend Emily has been studying for the New York State Bar Exam and decided to spend her birthday studying in Washington Square Park. She had this great idea, inviting friends to join her in the park, to study or read a book, or just say hi. Of course, I wanted to bring her some food. It’s really the best or only way I know how to say Happy Birthday!

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Lon’s Ragu

Monday, July 20, 2009

A long time ago I worked in south Brooklyn (Sheepshead Bay) in the back of a charity, in a small room that barely fit me and Theresa, a hardcore Italian-American. She was a great person, but had a harsh (typical Brooklyn) personality; she had a raspy voice and didn’t take BS from anyone; especially about “gravy” vs. “sauce”. If you’re thinking “gravy” is something brown you pour over steak, move on, you’re not ready for this.

Theresa explained that a tomato-based sauce without meat in it (like marinara), is “sauce.” If it contains meat, then it is not a “sauce” it’s “gravy.” So what is the premier gravy? Ragu.  (p.s. I do not agree with her assessment, this is sauce).  Also, this is another checkpoint, if you think I might be referring to the bottled sauce, you are on the wrong web site.

Seriuos Ragu 1

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